Compiler aided overloading

I was playing with xUnit.net for a pet project of mine. I wasn’t writing test cases with xUnit rather I was using the underlying xUnit engine to discover test cases and invoke calls that execute desired test cases. Forget the details of what I was doing, let us talk about it in a different post. But for now, I was consuming xUnit’s backend library.

XunitFrontController is the gateway to xUnit’s world; AFAIK. You create an instance of the controller specifying the target assembly.

var xfc = new XunitFrontController(
  AppDomainSupport.IfAvailable,
  "{full path of the assembly where the test cases reside}"
);

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Problem Reduction

Problem Reduction is what I call when a given problem can be expressed in terms of or solved using a solution to an alternate problem.

Take for instance, the word distance problem: Find the shortest distance between two words in a given set of words. Following is an unanimous solution, I suppose:

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JINQ

In his talk at the CppCon 2014, Bjarne Stroustrup explained, politely and brilliantly, how to write succinct expressive yet intent-ful code. The task is especially hard when there are parties interested in trolling1 rather than contributing. Like Stroustrup explains back, it is difficult to find the real meaning out of a large block of (legacy) code.

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Publishing C++/CLI on LeanPub

I came across LeanPub a few months back. I believe it was through hanselman – blog, video or something. I liked LeanPub instantly because of a couple of reasons.

  • It supports writing in markdown and I love markdown.
  • There is a large collection and variety of books including technical books and material, some of which are free too.
  • In case you are not a professional writer, the publication process encourages you with the feeling as if you are one.

I hadn’t written/published any lengthy material in a long time except the C+/CLI Primer on CodeProject. Why not publish same, I thought, and actually published. I wasn’t even expecting any response from anyone since the material was on C++/CLI, a language that gave me the impression that I was the only one using it at the time I published on CodeProject. 😀 I am really impressed that the material topped more than 50 downloads in about three months since it was published. Heck, a couple of them even paid despite the fact that the material is free. Not only am I humbled by this encouraging gesture but I am also convinced that C++/CLI is still being pursued and will continue to live – production, academic or as a pet language. Go grab your copy of the booklet – C++/CLI Primer. It’s free!

.NET for the next generation

It was about a decade ago when Visual Studio .NET 2002 was launched. Having worked with Visual Studio 6 until then, the new interface was refreshing and powerful along with .NET and the suite of languages, tools and technologies. If you were there, you would have felt times were changing. Beyond the cool and modern interface, Visual Studio .NET 2002 had a lot more to offer compared to Visual Studio 6 — .NET. It was an exciting time for me back then.

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An Unfair World of Tuples, Anons., var and auto

It all began when I wanted to return more than one value from one of the methods. Although my attempts ended futile, it was fun exploring and musing how things could have been.

There are at least a couple of options to return multiple values from a method:-

  1. return an instance of a class that holds the values
  2. return a tuple

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